Memory Stock- Your Source for Computer Memory and all other memory upgrades for Apple, Cisco, Compaq, Dell, Gateway, HP, IBM and other major brands. We grant schools, universities, government agencies, non-profit agencies and business corporations 15 days terms with a purchase order, Click here for instruction on how to submit a Purchase Order
MemoryStock : Computer Memory RAM Upgrades for Dell Computer, Apple, Gateway, HP, IBM Computer RAM, DDR2 SDRAM, Printer, Cisco Memory Upgrades Your source for all memory upgrades My Account Shopping Cart Help
Computer Memory Upgrade HP Memory Upgrade Gateway Memory Upgrade IBM Memory Upgrade Cisco Memory Upgrade Emachines  Memory Upgrade


Acer Memory
Apple Memory
Compaq Memory
Dell Memory
Emachines Memory
Gateway Memory
HP Memory
IBM Memory
Sony Memory
Sun Memory
Cisco Memory

more ..

Computer Memory
Desktop Memory
Laptop Memory
Printer Memory
DDR3 Memory
DDR2 Memory
DDR Memory
SDRAM Memory
RAMBUS Memory
About Us
Help
Warranty
Shipping Info
Return Policy
RMA Request

Determining what type of memory you need.
 

Type | Socket | Amount

More information on memory determination...

Looking Inside | Check the Manual | Identification

Type

  • FPM – Fast Page - If you have a 486, you probably have FPM
  • EDO – Extended Data Out - If you have an early Pentium system, you probably have EDO
  • SDRAM - If you have a Pentium or Celeron system purchased in 1999, you probably have SDRAM
  • Sockets

    Memory modules plug into a socket on the motherboard. There are three socket types.

  • SIMM – 30 pin – 3 inches in length
  • SIMM – 72 pin – 4 inches in length
  • DIMM – 168 pin – 5 inches in length
  • Most older 486 machines will use 30 pin modules. Later model 486 and Pentium machines will probably use 72 pin modules. More recent Pentium machines may have 168 pin.

    Amount

    Memory sizes increase by the power of 2. This results in sizes of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256 MBs.

    On some older 486 machines, one memory module can be added at a time.

    On most Pentium machines, modules must be added in pairs.

    Each pair must be of the same size.

    SDRAM modules can be added one at a time.

    For example, if you have 8 MBs of memory on a Pentium, you have two 4 MB modules. To increase to 16 MBs, you need to add two more 4 MB modules. To increase to 24 MBs, you need to add two 8 MB modules.

    Looking Inside

    Now that you know the parameters, how do you determine which type you need? Looking inside the computer will not provide all of the information. It will confirm how many modules you currently have. You can also confirm the type and quantity of open sockets. If you only have four sockets and each socket contains a module, you will have to replace some of the existing memory modules.

    Check the Manual

    The other place to find the correct information is your owner’s manual. The manufacturer should have listed the type of memory required. You will need to determine the parity and speed.

    Identification

    Now that you have the necessary information, you find an ad for memory and still you may not be able to determine which modules you need. Why? Because the computer industry thrives on confusion and abbreviations. Here’s how to interpret the coding scheme.

    30 pin modules

    For 30 pin modules you will see something like

  • 1 x 9-60
  • 4 x 9-70
  • 4 x 8-70
  • The first number is the size in MB’s. In our example this would be 1MB or 4MB.

    The second number represents parity. The value 9 represents parity and 8 represents non-parity. (Of course that makes a lot of sense!) The 9 or 8 also identifies that it is a 30 pin module.

    The third value represents the speed.

    72 pin modules

    For 72 pin modules you will see something like

  • 1 x 32-60
  • 2 x 32-70
  • 4 x 36-60
  • 8 x 36-70
  • Just like the 30 pin modules, the first value represents the size, EXCEPT it only represents ¼ of the total memory size. Don’t ask why, just accept it. So the value of 4 represents a 16 MB (4 x 4) module. A value of 8 represents a 32 MB (4 x 8) module.

    The second value, again just like the 30 pin, represents parity and the number of pins. 36 is used for parity and 32 for non-parity. You aren’t asking why again, are you?

    The third value represents the speed, the same as the 30 pin.

    If you have any question regarding memory modules, please do not hesitate to contactus.

    Customer service is available M-F, 9-5 PST at 209-475-0152, 209-478-0115, 209-478-0237

     

    © 2007 MemoryStock
     Help | Terms & Conditions  & Important Shipping Information | Warranty | Technical Support | Return Policy